Republican Voters Lose Confidence In Mitch McConnell

(ConservativePeak.com)- It’s no secret that a divide has been created — and grown — between former President Donald Trump and some of the top leaders of the Republican Party.

Those who have either spoken out against the former president, or who have not thrown their full support behind him, have faced his wrath. In addition, they’re also seeing a major decline in support among Republican voters.

In fact, new polling data has shown that GOP voters are also shifting support away from those “establishment figures” of the party. One of those people is Mitch McConnell, now the minority leader in the Senate.

McConnell, a 79-year-old lawmaker from Kentucky, has been known as the “Grim Reaper” for his ability to consistently kill off initiatives from Democrats. But now, he ranks last among other Republicans in a poll conducted for Reuters by Ipsos.

In that poll, 57% of Americans said they had an unfavorable view of McConnell. Of that group, 29% said they had a “very” unfavorable view of him. What’s more telling is that 67% of Democrats and 49% of Republicans reported the unfavorable view of the leader of the GOP in the U.S. Senate.

McConnell served as majority leader in the Senate from 2015 until January of this year, when Democrats assumed a slight technical majority in the Upper Chamber.

The Kentucky Republican had long been a strong ally of Trump. He worked hand-in-hand with the former president to not just successfully confirm three of Trump’s Supreme Court nominees, but also hundreds of judicial nominees to benches across the country.

Things went south for the relationship, though, following the attacks on the U.S. Capitol building on January 6. Following the attacks, leading up to and including Trump’s second impeachment trial, McConnell said:

“There is no question, none, that President Trump is practically and morally responsible for provoking the events of the day. No question about it.”

While McConnell voted to acquit Trump in that impeachment trial, he copped out and said he did it because of a technicality. He said that since Trump was no longer in the White House, it was unconstitutional to hold an impeachment trial against him.

In other words, if Trump were still in office, it’s very possible that McConnell would have voted to convict him. That’s quite the diversion from the message that McConnell was spewing while he and Trump had a good relationship.

According to the Ipsos poll, Trump still remains the most popular Republicans among voters in his party. The poll found that 74% of GOP voters said they viewed the former president “favorably.” That’s way ahead of the 28% of Republican voters who view McConnell in a favorable light.

This overwhelming GOP voter support for Trump is likely to spill over to candidates that the former president throws his endorsement behind. In recent days, that includes Senator Rick Scott of Florida and Henry McMaster, the governor of South Carolina.

Others in Congress who align themselves with Trump and his ideals, such as Missouri Senator Josh Hawley, are likely to gain favorable support from GOP voters, too.

It’s no secret that a divide has been created — and grown — between former President Donald Trump and some of the top leaders of the Republican Party.

Those who have either spoken out against the former president, or who have not thrown their full support behind him, have faced his wrath. In addition, they’re also seeing a major decline in support among Republican voters.

In fact, new polling data has shown that GOP voters are also shifting support away from those “establishment figures” of the party. One of those people is Mitch McConnell, now the minority leader in the Senate.

McConnell, a 79-year-old lawmaker from Kentucky, has been known as the “Grim Reaper” for his ability to consistently kill off initiatives from Democrats. But now, he ranks last among other Republicans in a poll conducted for Reuters by Ipsos.

In that poll, 57% of Americans said they had an unfavorable view of McConnell. Of that group, 29% said they had a “very” unfavorable view of him. What’s more telling is that 67% of Democrats and 49% of Republicans reported the unfavorable view of the leader of the GOP in the U.S. Senate.

McConnell served as majority leader in the Senate from 2015 until January of this year, when Democrats assumed a slight technical majority in the Upper Chamber.

The Kentucky Republican had long been a strong ally of Trump. He worked hand-in-hand with the former president to not just successfully confirm three of Trump’s Supreme Court nominees, but also hundreds of judicial nominees to benches across the country.

Things went south for the relationship, though, following the attacks on the U.S. Capitol building on January 6. Following the attacks, leading up to and including Trump’s second impeachment trial, McConnell said:

“There is no question, none, that President Trump is practically and morally responsible for provoking the events of the day. No question about it.”

While McConnell voted to acquit Trump in that impeachment trial, he copped out and said he did it because of a technicality. He said that since Trump was no longer in the White House, it was unconstitutional to hold an impeachment trial against him.

In other words, if Trump were still in office, it’s very possible that McConnell would have voted to convict him. That’s quite the diversion from the message that McConnell was spewing while he and Trump had a good relationship.

According to the Ipsos poll, Trump still remains the most popular Republicans among voters in his party. The poll found that 74% of GOP voters said they viewed the former president “favorably.” That’s way ahead of the 28% of Republican voters who view McConnell in a favorable light.

This overwhelming GOP voter support for Trump is likely to spill over to candidates that the former president throws his endorsement behind. In recent days, that includes Senator Rick Scott of Florida and Henry McMaster, the governor of South Carolina.

Others in Congress who align themselves with Trump and his ideals, such as Missouri Senator Josh Hawley, are likely to gain favorable support from GOP voters, too.